Tags

, , , , , , ,

Zimmer-articleLarge

For the first time, neuroscientists have used fMRI scanners to track the brain activity of both experienced and novice writers as they sat down — or, in this case, lay down — to turn out a piece of fiction.

The researchers, led by Martin Lotze of the University of Greifswald in Germany, observed a broad network of regions in the brain working together as people produced their stories. But there were notable differences between the two groups of subjects. The inner workings of the professionally trained writers in the bunch, the scientists argue, showed some similarities to people who are skilled at other complex actions, like music or sports.

The research is drawing strong reactions. Some experts praise it as an important advance in understanding writing and creativity, while others criticize the research as too crude to reveal anything meaningful about the mysteries of literature or inspiration. (1)

I say every man who tries to understand the mind through the brain is stupid.
I say every man who tries to understand humans from meat is short-sighted.
I say that every scientist who tries to think based on UNPROVEN materialistic dogmas without explicitly admitting it, is not a true and honest scientist.

Imagine some scientists analyzing the brain of Beethoven.
Imagine Beethoven standing next to them.
Silent in his thoughts.
Listening to music.
Divine music.
A mind full of creativity.
Irrational silent creativity.
Can electrons moving produce etherial music?
Can a human be who he is without true God guiding his inspiration?

fMRI.
How stupid does it sound…

Advertisements