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si-bigdata

Hoping to tame the torrent of data churning out of biology labs, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today announced $32 million in awards in 2014 to help researchers develop ways to analyze and use large biological data sets.

The awards come out of NIH’s Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative, announced last year after NIH concluded it needed to invest more in efforts to use the growing number of data sets—from genomics, proteins, and imaging to patient records—that biomedical researchers are amassing. For example, in one such “dry biology” project, researchers mixed public data on gene expression in cells and patients with diseases to predict new uses for existing drugs.

ENIGMA project on the other hand collects thousands of brain images to allow researchers to better understand nervous system wiring. (1)

Analyze too much data. And you will reach the same conclusion as you would have if you analyzed nothing at all.

How can everything behave differently from One? Parts exist just because something from which they derived existed in the first place. And how can the parts have different behaviour than that thing from which they were created?

Infinity. Nothing. Something.
So different.
And so similar at the same time…

From One to Many to Infinity and back again.
The only way out leads directly to where you started from…

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