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Physics says that if two particles are entangled on a quantum level, they are permanently linked — a change in one particle will instantaneously affect the other one, no matter the distance between them. That’s something that could be fantastic for quickly transporting information across vast distances … but only if we can figure out how to use it.

Scientists (and corporations) are already building working computers that rely on quantum entanglement. Now one of the biggest challenges for quantum computing is distance. Unlike our current computing networks, which swiftly move information across thousands of miles via super-speedy cables, quantum computing doesn’t have the same reach yet. The longest distance over which information has been transferred via a quantum network is just 300 kilometers, which might someday be enough for conveying information around a city or region, but not really enough for international quantum computing–especially across an ocean.

Now, scientists think they might have found a decidedly old-fashioned way to solve the ocean problem. The solution is already in use at ports around the world: the humble container ship. Scientists writing in a paper posted to arXiv.org have proposed using shipping containers to transport critical parts of a computing network from one side of the ocean to the other. The container ships will function kind of like a Pony Express, but instead of carrying messages, the cargo will be slightly different: they’ll be moving quantum objects. (1)

We are all travelling.
We send things travelling.
We think of other people travelling.
We have all left a hair or a button somewhere…

We are all interconnected with others.
We are all interconnected with everything.
Don’t look up for that button.
It makes you One with the Cosmos.

Damn!

I lost another one!

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