Tags

,

mg22429952.600-1_300

The great e-commerce boom has had an unexpected side effect – the rise of digital courts.

eBay has long relied on its Resolution Centre to solve petty disagreements between buyers and sellers, and the model has become surprisingly popular among others who do business online. So much so, in fact, that one Swedish company has applied it to all kinds of consumer complaints.

Swiftcourt, based in Lund, allows individuals to file small claims. For one client – who wishes to remain anonymous – Swiftcourt turned out to be very handy. After receiving a second-hand motorbike from an online sale, he realised that it was not as described. It was 450cc, not 540cc, and some parts were missing.

Initially, the seller refused a refund, but the two had previously agreed to use Swiftcourt as an arbitrator in the event of a dispute. A few weeks after the arbitration process was started on the Swiftcourt website, both parties were handed a verdict – the plaintiff’s case was upheld and a full refund following return of the bike was arranged. The seller also had to pay both parties’ Swiftcourt fees. (1)

We want justice.
We believe in higher ideas.
We believe that these ideas can be served on their own.
We still believe in God.
We just don’t know where He is hiding…

Advertisements