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By tinkering with the gut’s bacterial residents, scientists have changed the behavior of lab animals and small numbers of people. Microbial meddling has turned anxious mice bold and shy mice social. Rats inoculated with bacteria from depressed people develop signs of depression themselves. And small studies of people suggest that eating specific kinds of bacteria may change brain activity and ease anxiety. Because gut bacteria can make the very chemicals that brain cells use to communicate, the idea makes a certain amount of sense. Though preliminary, such results suggest that the right bacteria in your gut could brighten mood and perhaps even combat pernicious mental disorders including anxiety and depression. The wrong microbes, however, might lead in a darker direction. (1)

We are part of a larger ecosystem.

Everything affecting everything.

We do not think on our own.

Other beings “think” for us as we do for other beings as well.

Accept that and you will become the wisest man ever…

Let go.

Let the cosmos guide you into crying.

Let yourself guide the cosmos into laughter.

They are not your tears.

It is your laughter.